Moving Children’s Book Tours Brooklyn

Art, Children's

All photos courtesy of Penguin Random House There are some children’s books that inspire people of all ages with their profundity, and “Sakura’s Cherry Blossoms” is no exception. The book touches on such universal themes as the immigrant experience, feeling out of place in a new setting and the love in intergenerational relationships. Its February […]

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Distinguished historian shakes up civil rights history

Events, History, Political Activism

“What of the past is remembered, celebrated, and mourned is at the core of national identity — and the process of what is told and not told is often a function of power,” writes historian Jeanne Theoharis.“And the task of honoring can also be a form of stripping and silencing.” Theoharis is a distinguished professor […]

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Beloved Novel “The Idiot”–Now in Paperback

Fiction

When published in hardcover in 2017, Elif Batuman’s debut novel, “The Idiot” dazzled critics and readers alike. Even Greta Gerwig, actress-now- movie director of indie sensation “Lady Bird,” named it one of her favorite books of the year, saying “She [Batuman] accomplishes in this novel what I’m always trying to do in film: make the […]

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Re-visiting Marine Park with Mark Chiusano

Memoir

Marine Park is one of those south Brooklyn neighborhoods that often gets overlooked. In his debut collection “Marine Park,” Mark Chiusano immortalized the spirit and the cast of characters that inhabit Brooklyn’s special southeastern marshland. While the collection was released in 2014, the street-smart and buoyant stories in 23-year-old Mark Chiusano’s “Marine Park” possess something […]

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Moving Children’s Book Tours Brooklyn


Art, Children's

All photos courtesy of Penguin Random House There are some children’s books that inspire people of all ages with their profundity, and “Sakura’s Cherry Blossoms” is no exception. The book touches on such universal themes as the immigrant experience, feeling out of place in a new setting and the love in intergenerational relationships. Its February […]

February 20, 2018

Beloved Novel “The Idiot”–Now in Paperback


Fiction

When published in hardcover in 2017, Elif Batuman’s debut novel, “The Idiot” dazzled critics and readers alike. Even Greta Gerwig, actress-now- movie director of indie sensation “Lady Bird,” named it one of her favorite books of the year, saying “She [Batuman] accomplishes in this novel what I’m always trying to do in film: make the […]

February 13, 2018

Re-visiting Marine Park with Mark Chiusano


Memoir

Marine Park is one of those south Brooklyn neighborhoods that often gets overlooked. In his debut collection “Marine Park,” Mark Chiusano immortalized the spirit and the cast of characters that inhabit Brooklyn’s special southeastern marshland. While the collection was released in 2014, the street-smart and buoyant stories in 23-year-old Mark Chiusano’s “Marine Park” possess something […]

February 2, 2018

Prospect Park Cartoonist Releases Paperback of Graphic Novel


Art

“Adrian Tomine can draw, think, write and feel. He sees everything, he knows everything; he’s in your apartment, he’s on the subway, he’s in your dreams. He knows about aging baseball fans and delusional horticulturists, he knows hapless fathers and awkward nerd-girl stand-ups, he knows the single and the married, the mad and the sane, knows when to […]

February 1, 2018

The Invention of Ana


Fiction

Thirty-year-old author Mikkel Rosengaard grew up in Denmark, but has lived in the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Greenpoint and Bedstuy since 2010. “Can’t be much different, these two places,” he says. His debut novel, “The Invention of Ana”, is set primarily in Brooklyn, where the narrator’s life entangles with his subject, Ana. The novel will be […]

January 24, 2018

It Occurs to Me That I Am America


Non-fiction, Political Activism

“It Occurs to Me That I Am America” is a collaboration of authors and artists born in response to the 2016 election. Two of the book’s contributors, Bliss Broyard and Philip Gourevitch, are Brooklyn residents. They will both be speaking with the book’s editor Jonathan Santlofer, as well as contributors Anna Dunn, Elinor Lipman and […]

January 23, 2018

Art of Writing About Deaths Captured in Documentary


film

For many individuals, obituaries may be the only form of written biography left behind after death. However, as writer Margalit Fox says in the 2016 film “Obit”, “Obits have next to nothing to do with death and absolutely everything to do with life.” Director and producer duo Vanessa Gould and Caitlin Mae Burke created “Obit”, […]

December 26, 2017

Novel Centers On The Impact Of Gentrification In Brooklyn


Fiction

No matter how you feel about gentrification, there is no denying that it has touched nearly every corner of Brooklyn and is changing the look of some of the most historic neighborhoods. Fort Greene native, Naima Coster has a deeply personal understanding of the impact of gentrification on long-time residents. The author, who currently teaches […]

December 20, 2017

“Brooklyn’s Sweet Ruin”


Art, Events, History

When it was rebuilt in 1883, the Domino Sugar Refinery was the largest in the world. That year, the Brooklyn Eagle described the new facility as “colossal”. At its peak, the factory processed one third of all of the sugar consumed in a year in the United States, and one eighth of all the sugar […]

December 13, 2017

Jill Eisenstadt’s New Novel Revisits the Rockaways


Fiction, Humor

The Rockaways are part of an important network of diverse habitats, and serve the ever-important role of adding a protective buffer for Brooklyn’s coastal areas.   They also happen to be the setting for Brooklyn resident Jill Eisenstadt’s newest book, Swell. The book includes some of the characters of her debut novel, From Rockaway, which […]

December 11, 2017